Live Poster & Demo Session (1:00 – 2:00pm)

Posters


P1: The Science Fiction and Fantasy Short Stories Database

Amber Lamboo; Hannah Oudenaar; Leah Vanderweide; Samuel Plato (MLIS, iSchool, University of British Columbia)

Abstract: The SFFSSDB is an MLIS graduate student designed application meant to collect (as many as possible) anthology-based short stories of anSFF nature, ranging from 2010 to present day. As a student project, it is not an exhaustive database, and very much still a work in progress. When we proposed designing the database in 2021, there was a distinct lack of short story databases that we, as students, could utilize efficiently to explore the many anthologies and collections that exist. This prompted the research into, and the eventual design of the SFFSSDB. The SFFSSDB seeks to catalogue at both the anthology and short story record. One of the goals we were most interested in accomplishing was creating a diverse and welcoming space, including paying special attention to cataloguing name authority records for transgender authors who previously published under a deadname. We have also attempted to establish an inclusive cataloguing system by maintaining an awareness of personal, institutional, and societal biases in terms of controlled vocabularies and cataloguing fields.

P2: Development of a Tool to Communicate Postoperative Pain Risks of Children to Families: Results of a Second Round of Clinician and Family Co-Design

Charlie Fokkens (BA, BEd, iSchool, University of British Columbia); Michael Wood (PhD, Anesthesiology, Pharmacology, & Therapeutics, UBC; BCCHRI); Kim Correa (BA, iSchool, UBC); Rama Sreepada (PhD, APT, UBC; BCCHRI); Kent Loftsgard (Patient Partner, BCCHRI); Elodie Portales-Casamar (PhD, Pediatrics, UBC; BCCHRI); Matthias Görges (PhD, APT, UBC; BCCHRI)

Abstract: PURPOSE: At BC Children’s Hospital (BCCH), pain management has been identified as an area for improvement. We aim to gain insight into preferences for risk communication through co-design and apply these preferences to a tool to communicate individualized prediction of pediatric pain risk following surgery to parents and clinicians. METHODS: We recruited clinicians with expertise in postoperative pain, patient partners with lived pediatric surgical experience, and parents whose children had recently undergone surgery at BCCH. One-hour focus groups of 3-4 participants were conducted via Zoom. Three activities were completed: 1) participants rapidly sketched ideas for effective visual representations of risk; 2) participants directed researchers to assemble a wireframe of the risk communication tool components; 3) participants were asked to provide general feedback on our preliminary prototype. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically. RESULTS: Five themes emerged for use in our tool redesign: 1) enable communication of risk severity (a score that shows a variable risk on a scale from low to high), 2) increase approachability (adding child-friendly or contextual elements), 3) order elements more intuitively (according to participant’s description of interpretation workflows and importance of information), 4) display the uncertainty of the risk score (to reflect the uncertainty of statistics), and 5) reduce the anxiety for families by emphasizing positive and modifiable risk factors (e.g. discussing comfort instead of pain and emphasizing strategies that will improve the patient’s comfort). CONCLUSIONS: Co-design findings influenced the redesign of our initial risk communication tool and re-framed our design to focus on maintenance of post-operative comfort. Our team will conduct a further round of co-design to guide our final prototype before its usability evaluation.

P3: HapticsCommons: Democratizing the Haptic Design Ecosystem

Hannah Elbaggari (MSc, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Tommy Nguyen; Erin Chong; Angel Bao (Undergraduate, COGS, UBC)

Abstract: Accessibility for people interested in haptics starts at who has access to the knowledge and hardware. Currently, access to haptics resources is limited outside of academia and other Western systems. Haptic design and knowledge sharing has been distributed within academia, though these efforts often neglect to mention designers outside of the Eurocentric, STEM-aligned, technical sphere. It is well known that sharing haptics is difficult without experiencing it firsthand – and designing these experiences is even harder with the multitude of applications, perceptual concepts, devices, and so on. Yet, individuals remain experts in their own lived experiences, whether that be topical, experiential, or technical. Is there a way to uplift specialized haptics knowledge for a larger collaboration and knowledge sharing ecosystem? How can we create a resource that provides an empowering, inclusive, and reflexive design ecosystem for all? Our recent work addresses this question through a participatory design approach. We aim to bridge a gap in haptics knowledge accessibility through principles of design justice, and to create a haptics web-based resource that provides an empowering and inclusive design ecosystem. We also hope to contribute to a broader definition of ‘haptician’; one that expands beyond mainstream representations by identifying accessibility and inclusivity needs for the future of haptics.

P4: Positude: Mobile-based Mental Supporting Solution

Hans Song (MLIS, iSchool, University of British Columbia)

Abstract: While mental health issues have become a growing concern, university students are experiencing significant barriers in efficiently locating mental supporting resources and overcoming the stigma of mental challenges. The project was brought in as a final assignment of LIBR 506: Human-Information Interaction with the intention to develop an interactive user-centered experience for students to address awareness of mental wellness and reduce the impacts of stigmatization. Our solution to the problem, Positude, is a mobile application that measures user emotion and offers personalized mental coping strategies in AI technology like algorithm-based recommendation engines. Unlike our competitors, MindDoc, Moodnotes, and Wysa, our mobile application Positude tailors to the needs of university students and provides nearby resources in a cost and time-effective manner. For the scope of this project, our team narrows down the design into the main user flow where users can document their mental status and receive personalized coping suggestions. After opening the app Positude, the users start with the login screen. The users will have the option to switch to the signup screen if they do not have an account. Then, they will be directed to the home screen and they can complete a short self-assessment by answering a few questions. After having checked in for a couple of days (preferably a week), the users will see a list of personalized mental wellness recommendations based on the input data. Eventually, the users may browse and decide on the suggested resources that they are interested to proceed with. 

P5: Designing a Data Collection Protocol for the Development of a Pediatric Postsurgical Pain Risk Prediction Model

Michael D. Wood, Rama Sreepada (Postdoctoral Fellow, Anesthesiology, Pharmacology, & Therapeutics, UBC; BCCHRI); Kim Correa (PhD, iSchool, UBC); Kent C. Loftsgard, Isabel Jordan (Patient Partner); Simon Whyte, Gillian Lauder (Clinical Associate Professor, APT,UBC; BCCHRI); Elodie Portales-Casamar, Matthias Görges (Clinical Assistant Professor, APT, UBC; BCCHRI).

Abstract: PURPOSE. Persistent postsurgical pain is a potential risk of pediatric surgery that can have detrimental consequences. To personalize postsurgical pain management, it is imperative to identify risk factors specific to BC Children’s Hospital (BCCH) patients, as well as gather patient-reported experience and outcome measures (PREMs; PROMs) quantifying healthcare experience and health status, respectively. METHODS. We conducted focus groups with parents of children who had undergone surgery, patient partners with lived pediatric surgical experience, and clinicians and allied health professionals at BCCH. Sessions were held virtually using Zoom and lasted one hour. Data were analyzed thematically using NVivo to identify risk factors, PREMs, and PROMs for the design of a risk model building data collection study protocol. RESULTS. Eighteen participants attended six focus groups. Participants identified five domains to inform data collection study design: 1) demographics (e.g. age, ethnicity), 2) clinical characteristics (e.g. length of stay, type of surgery), 3) psychosocial factors (e.g. anxiety, depression), 4) PREMs (e.g. satisfaction with care), and 5) PROMs (e.g. mobility, pain). Participants also indicated several factors that are challenging to quantify, but crucial to improving care: 1) clarity of discharge instructions, 2) availability of support networks, 3) access to and coordination of care, 4) child comprehension of procedure and recovery, 5) transparency of side effects and needs for aftercare, and 6) continuous pain management. CONCLUSIONS. Initial analysis identified five key data domains to inform the design of a novel research data collection platform for the risk of postsurgical pain. Participants will return for additional focus groups to identify tools to capture and quantify risk factors both in hospital and after discharge to guide the study design and development of a pain risk identification tool.

P6: How Do Supernatural Scenes in VR Meditation Affect People’s Experience/ Mental Feelings (compared with natural scenes)?

Minghang Li (MEng, ECE, University of British Columbia); Dongwook Yoon (Assistant Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: VR meditation has gradually become an effective and helpful way to relax and enjoy ourselves. Scenes are the indispensable elements in VR mindfulness which can bring users to somewhere known or unknown. Many studies have shown the benefits of natural scenes in VR meditation (e.g., stress reducing and refreshing minds). However, the impact of supernatural scenes and the comparison between natural scenes in VR meditation remain unclear. This empirical study aims to explore the feelings and experiences of users towards supernatural scenes in VR meditation and provide points for improving present guidelines in VR meditation. Questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were conducted among 9 participants in this study, and finally four main points were carried out to make complement to present guidelines.

P7: Interaction Design for VR Applications: Understanding Needs for University Curricula

Oloff C. Biermann, Daniel Ajisafe (MSc, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Dongwook Yoon (Assistant Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: As virtual reality (VR) is emerging in the tech sector, developers and designers are under pressure to create immersive experiences for their products. However, the current curricula from top institutions focus primarily on technical considerations for building VR applications, missing out on concerns and usability problems specific to VR interaction design. To better understand current needs, we examined the status quo of existing university pedagogies by carrying out a content analysis of undergraduate and graduate courses about VR and related areas offered in the major citadels of learning and conducting interviews with 7 industry experts. Our analysis reveals that the current teaching practices underemphasize design thinking, prototyping, and evaluation skills, while focusing on technical implementation. We recommend VR curricula should emphasize design principles and guidelines, offer training in prototyping and ideation, prioritize practical design exercises while providing industry insights, and encourage students to solve VR design problems beyond the classroom.

P8: Being RAD: Developing a System for Community-Based Sharing of Assistive Recreational Equipment

Pegah Derakhshan (PhD student, Rehabilitation Sciences, University of British Columbia); Ben Mortenson; William C. Miller; Delphine Labbé; Ian M. Mitchell; Yaman Sanobar

Abstract: Participation in outdoor recreational activities contributes to physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing. Because of accessibility issues, individuals with mobility limitations may be excluded from these activities or be unable to do them independently. Furthermore, adaptive recreational devices are often prohibitively expensive and difficult to fund as they are not considered “medically necessary” which is especially problematic given the poverty rate for individuals with mobility impairment is more than double that of the general population. To address these participation barriers, we aim to develop a cross-sectoral, community-based partnership to build and evaluate a recreational adaptive device renting program with online access for individuals with mobility impairment. Our Recreational Adaptive Devices (RAD) partnership will focus on program development through the first three phases. In Phase 1, to PLAN the intervention we will develop an in-depth understanding of the user’s equipment needs. In Phase 2 we will ACT by opening the GearBox and designing an online/app for it, a low-barrier facility in Langford city, which rents adaptive recreation devices at a nominal fee to individuals with mobility impairments. To promote the accessibility of the GearBox renting process, a mobile app and online program will be created using a think-aloud method. In Phase 3 we will EVALUATE the software and the program overall. Our collaborative partnerships will provide opportunities and remove barriers for individuals living with mobility issues, helping them maintain healthy, active, independent lifestyles through access to the outdoors, regardless of financial circumstance. This partnership will help Canada live up to its obligations as a signatory of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which will benefit not only GearBox end users but society as a whole.

P9: Co-designing Mental Health Technologies with International University Students in Canada

Sang-Wha Sien (PhD student, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Joanna McGrenere (Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: Mental health concerns have become a serious concern among university students. And among this population, research has shown that international students in North America, a diverse group of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds, are particularly vulnerable because they typically underutilize mental health services compared to their domestic counterparts. They also tend to be unfamiliar with the Western approaches to mental health. While mental health technologies, such as mobile and web based apps and online communities, have been shown to hold a lot of promise in providing support among students, international students’ mental health remains underexplored in HCI. In this study, we conducted synchronous and remote co-design sessions where 14 international students of non-Western backgrounds as well as 5 campus wellbeing professionals shared their perspectives on designing for mental health. To help drive ideation during the sessions, we also collaboratively developed personas with our participants. Based on the analysis of their brainstormed ideas and sketches, we came up with a set of design dimensions which span different types of support, interaction, and safety. We then developed 4 medium-fidelity mockups that spanned these dimensions in various ways, presenting a diverse range of design features that our participants desired. Finally, we elicited participant feedback using the mockups in an online survey. Findings suggest that the students negotiate a complex understanding of trust, comfort, and perceived helpfulness when they consider what types of designs to adopt. Each of the mockups offer a range of features to support individual differences and preferences.

P10: Design Guidelines for Social VR Meditations as Additional Feature to Combine with Solo-User VR Meditations

Ying Chen (MLIS, iSchool, University of British Columbia)

Abstract: Mental health concerns have become a serious concern among university students. And among this population, research has shown that international students in North America, a diverse group of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds, are particularly vulnerable because they typically underutilize mental health services compared to their domestic counterparts. They also tend to be unfamiliar with the Western approaches to mental health. While mental health technologies, such as mobile and web based apps and online communities, have been shown to hold a lot of promise in providing support among students, international students’ mental health remains underexplored in HCI. In this study, we conducted synchronous and remote co-design sessions where 14 international students of non-Western backgrounds as well as 5 campus wellbeing professionals shared their perspectives on designing for mental health. To help drive ideation during the sessions, we also collaboratively developed personas with our participants. Based on the analysis of their brainstormed ideas and sketches, we came up with a set of design dimensions which span different types of support, interaction, and safety. We then developed 4 medium-fidelity mockups that spanned these dimensions in various ways, presenting a diverse range of design features that our participants desired. Finally, we elicited participant feedback using the mockups in an online survey. Findings suggest that the students negotiate a complex understanding of trust, comfort, and perceived helpfulness when they consider what types of designs to adopt. Each of the mockups offer a range of features to support individual differences and preferences.The growing digital wellness market and social distancing needs since the COVID-19 pandemic has made VR meditation application an increasingly popular choice to assist users to maintain their own mental health. Although solo-user VR meditations offer many health benefits, its lack of active interactions and social support makes forming meditation practices difficult for novice users. Therefore, social VR meditation such as EvolVR – group meditation led by a “meditation leader” in VR – has emerged as a new kind of VR meditation aiming to facilitate users’ health with the added benefit of user interactions. This study uses the qualitative research method to investigate whether there is a new opportunity to combine social VR meditations as an additional feature to solo-user VR meditations to increase future usage for VR meditations. Research questions include: (1) How are solo-user VR meditation experiences different from social VR meditation experiences? (2) Would users require social VR meditations as a meditation choice? (3) What are the design guidelines that users expect for social VR meditations to combine with solo-user VR meditations? Results show that though there is a new contradiction between group support and online social anxiety, user needs and expectations exist for social VR meditations. Hence, the application can advance from users’ required choice to a necessary choice with improvements made to its current shortcomings. Design guidelines for social VR mediations focusing on designing meditation leaders to reduce users’ social anxiety, designing avatars to increase users’ immersion and designing social processes to eliminate social anxiety are also proposed to achieve this goal.The growing digital wellness market and social distancing needs since the COVID-19 pandemic has made VR meditation application an increasingly popular choice to assist users to maintain their own mental health. Although solo-user VR meditations offer many health benefits, its lack of active interactions and social support makes forming meditation practices difficult for novice users. Therefore, social VR meditation such as EvolVR – group meditation led by a “meditation leader” in VR – has emerged as a new kind of VR meditation aiming to facilitate users’ health with the added benefit of user interactions. This study uses the qualitative research method to investigate whether there is a new opportunity to combine social VR meditations as an additional feature to solo-user VR meditations to increase future usage for VR meditations. Research questions include: (1) How are solo-user VR meditation experiences different from social VR meditation experiences? (2) Would users require social VR meditations as a meditation choice? (3) What are the design guidelines that users expect for social VR meditations to combine with solo-user VR meditations? Results show that though there is a new contradiction between group support and online social anxiety, user needs and expectations exist for social VR meditations. Hence, the application can advance from users’ required choice to a necessary choice with improvements made to its current shortcomings. Design guidelines for social VR mediations focusing on designing meditation leaders to reduce users’ social anxiety, designing avatars to increase users’ immersion and designing social processes to eliminate social anxiety are also proposed to achieve this goal.

P11: The Pocket Pelvis: Developing an Augmented Reality App for Better Understanding of Pelvis Anatomy

Ratthamnoon Prakitpong (MECH, University of British Columbia); Ishan Dixit (Graduate Student, Kinesiology, UBC); Ellen He, Eric Jeong, Jason Kim (Medical Student, UBC); Juyeong Oh (MECH, University of British Columbia); Mehrdad Ghomi (Graduate Student, Faculty of Applied Sciences, UBC); Dante Cerron (Undergraduate Student, CS, UBC); Dr. Claudia Krebs (Professor of Teaching, Cellular Anatomical Physiological Sciences, UBC)

Abstract: The human pelvis is one of the more complicated anatomical regions for students to understand due to its complex 3D geometry, the layered pelvic walls, and the differences between male and female pelvises. In order to facilitate the 3D learning of the pelvis we developed an augmented reality application that allows the learner to visualize structures of the pelvis on a 3D printed pelvis model. The 3D printed pelvis model was created based on volumetric reconstruction of the NIH Visible Human dataset. Pelvis structures, such as muscles and neurovasculature were created using Blender 3D modeling software. The application was created using Unity, and Vuforia was used for the augmented reality image recognition. The app was programmed for use on Android or iOS devices. The aim of this app was not to re-create an anatomical model, but rather to create a teaching tool that is both accurate and conceptual in nature. Iterative design of the user interface and the user experience led to an educational experience where students can manipulate the 3D printed pocket-sized pelvis and have control over which structures they can view in the augmented reality app. This approach has led to a set of best practices for this type of augmented reality app: – The 3D printed object needs to be generated using a filament that is not too shiny to minimize glare. the tags recognized by Vuforia for adding the augmented reality structures need to be unique and their size needs to be a compromise between optimal recognition and non-interference with the anatomy. – The user interface needs to be clearly structured and allow the user to interact with the augmented reality structures and their device seamlessly and simultaneously. – The combination of a physical object that can be freely turned with augmented reality structures that can be turned on and off by the user leads to a user experience that combines a haptic experience with visual cues.

P12: Design Principles for VanVR APP: a Virtual Anatomy Lab

Leena Alkhammash (PhD Student, University of British Columbia); Dr. Patrick Pennefather (Professor, Theatre and Film, UBC); Ishan Dixit (Graduate Student, Kinesiology, UBC); Sean Jeon (Product Manager, UBC); Amber Shao (3D artist, Center of Digital Media); Emma Liu (UI/UX Designer, Center of Digital Media); Sebastian Swic (Medical Student, UBC); Steve Zhang (Master of Digital Media, UBC); Austin Kvaale (CS, UBC); Aanandi Sidharth (CS, UBC); Dr. Claudia Krebs (Professor of Teaching, Cellular Anatomical Physiological Sciences Department, UBC)

Abstract: The human pelvis is one of the more complicated anatomical regions for students to understand due to its complex 3D geometry, the layered pelvic walls, and the differences between male and female pelvises. In order to facilitate the 3D learning of the pelvis we developed an augmented reality application that allows the learner to visualize structures of the pelvis on a 3D printed pelvis model. The 3D printed pelvis model was created based on volumetric reconstruction of the NIH Visible Human dataset. Pelvis structures, such as muscles and neurovasculature were created using Blender 3D modeling software. The application was created using Unity, and Vuforia was used for the augmented reality image recognition. The app was programmed for use on Android or iOS devices. The aim of this app was not to re-create an anatomical model, but rather to create a teaching tool that is both accurate and conceptual in nature. Iterative design of the user interface and the user experience led to an educational experience where students can manipulate the 3D printed pocket-sized pelvis and have control over which structures they can view in the augmented reality app. This approach has led to a set of best practices for this type of augmented reality app: – The 3D printed object needs to be generated using a filament that is not too shiny to minimize glare. the tags recognized by Vuforia for adding the augmented reality structures need to be unique and their size needs to be a compromise between optimal recognition and non-interference with the anatomy. – The user interface needs to be clearly structured and allow the user to interact with the augmented reality structures and their device seamlessly and simultaneously. – The combination of a physical object that can be freely turned with augmented reality structures that can be turned on and off by the user leads to a user experience that combines a haptic experience with visual cues.The VanVR APP (Vancouver Virtual Reality Anatomy and Pathology Project) is a virtual anatomy lab with 3D anatomy dissection scans, which in the post-pandemic learning environment is a “digital twin” to the physical lab. The principles of this re-design are based on instructors’ need to offer an alternate supplemental teaching environment, and students’ need to access high-quality anatomy scans preparing for the dissection lab experience. VanVR was created using Unity offering two user interfaces (UI): one for students and one for instructors. The student UI leads to a virtual anatomy lab (VAL) of interactive 3D models. The instructor UI; the Lab Maker (LM), allows instructors to customize their courses from a wide database of fully-labeled specimens, images, and videos. VanVR’s user experience (UX) of the VAL was designed to mimic a lab’s environment including anatomy code of conduct and many control functions. UI and UX designs intend to meet student needs, focusing on intuitive interfaces and interactions to maximize attention on the anatomy content rather than navigating technological difficulties. The VAL design resembles an actual anatomy lab, this mimicry principle induces learnability. The user control shows the main elements in a simple hierarchy, design, colors, and text font granting intuitive and seamless navigation. We added multiple logical routes to finish tasks and bypass system lags to deliver flexibility and redundancy. For more student-instructor interaction, instructors were given the feature to control the number of labels on the specimens or pose question labels to match the learning objectives. As a result, VanVR’s UI and UX design followed basic aesthetics aiming for an efficient and accessible learning/teaching tool. Our future plan includes adapting the UI and UX to smartphone/tablet screen size and features. For more accessibility and redundancy, a search feature will be added to allow users to rapidly find specimens.

P13: Visicorn: A intrusion detection visualization system

Francis Nguyen (PhD Student, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Jude Shamsi (Undergraduate, CS, UBC); Shabab Khan (Research Assistant, CS, UBC); Romina Mahinpei (Undergraduate, CS, UBC); Thomas Pasquier, Margo Seltzer, Tamara Munzner (Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: Anomaly-based detection systems are largely successful in detecting intrusions but do not identify the root cause of intrusion. Root cause analysis is hard as it still requires human expertise, especially at the operating system level. Visicorn is a visualization tool built on top of an intrusion detection system called Unicorn that flags anomalous behavior. Helping people understand whether and why the flagged anomaly is problematic is the goal. Unicorn uses a specific type of graph, a provenance graph, to flag anomalous behavior.

Demos


D1: Deepfakes: Authenticity Perception and Defaming Potential

Amit Ghimire (MSc, Computer Science, UBC); Yifan Liu (MLIS, iSchool, UBC)

Abstract: The emergence of deep-learning techniques in manipulating media, termed Deepfakes, has given access to resources for anyone to create fake malicious videos easily. Coupled with the trend of copious consumption of videos online, people are at risk of being exposed to videos created with ill intentions. Although social media platforms have started efforts to implement systems to detect and tag such fake videos, the nature of the creation of deepfake videos and poor performance of deep-learning based detection systems for videos not in their training dataset means a high chance of failure presenting users with fake videos as real (and vice versa). We ran an online experiment where participants were presented with negatively valenced real and fake videos either with i) no labels, ii) labels that matched the realness of the video, and iii) labels that conflicted with the realness of the videos. Our findings suggest that 1. People are more likely to mistake fake videos for real ones in case of conflicting labels, 2. Real videos will be perceived as real regardless of the labels, and 3. People form negative impressions toward the person in the video irrespective of how they perceive the realness of the video. These findings highlight that detecting and tagging fake videos do not limit their psychological effects, and solutions to nudge people to engage in online media critically are necessary.

D2: Designing a Low-Cost Craniotomy Surgical Simulator with Haptic Feedback: The Surgescope

Ashirbad Pradhan (MSc, Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo); Devyani McLaren (BSc, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Parinaz Ranjbaran (BSc, Mechanical Engineering, UBC); Ana Lucia Diaz de Leon Derby (BSc, Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo)

Abstract: Minimally invasive surgeries (MIS) are among the most revolutionary advances in surgical technologies. The long and slender tools used in MIS lessen tactile sensations, giving surgeons less feedback about the force they are exerting on the tissues and organs, hence contributing to inappropriate use of force, and possible trauma. In this case, the practice of training in a virtual environment rather than directly on patients has benefits for better performance of novice surgeons. Various surgical simulators ranging from virtual lab simulators to at-home tools are among simulation tools to help novice surgeons. Virtual lab simulators can provide realistic sensation and haptic feedback for the user to practice different tasks. However, special equipment and high cost of these devices limit their at-home applications. On the other hand, many low-fidelity solutions for simulating surgical procedures lack haptic feedback and often require users to assemble a set of objects for use. We present an iteratively designed low-cost haptic (multi-modal) craniotomy surgical learning interface using the Haply 2diy. The system provides haptic feedback, gamification elements and metrics on users’ performance. The surgical kit is evaluated with user studies (N = 2). Results show that the interface is beneficial early in a medical student’s surgical education.

D3: Haptic Herbology: Automatic texture rendering to support experiential STEM learning

Elizabeth Reid (MSc, Department of Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Jérémy Durette (MScA , Département de génie logiciel et des technologies de l’information, École de technologie supérieure); Ekaterina Durmanova (MaSc Systems Design Engineering – HCI Games Group, University of Waterloo)

Abstract: Experiential learning has been shown to benefit students in a variety of contexts, yet interacting with elements of the environment may sometimes be impossible or impractical. Haptic devices that virtually simulate real-world interactions can help bridge this gap. Our work explores the use of haptic texture rendering to learn about trees and how to identify them. Through several design iterations, we developed a method of automatically rendering tree bark textures using the Haply 2DIY, a two-degree-of-freedom, pantograph style force feedback device that is low cost and easy to use in a classroom setting. Our interface currently supports four tree species: oak, cedar, aspen, and horse chestnut. Based on informal user tests, we found there was no single best rendering technique that could easily capture the differences in texture between different tree types. Instead, specific individual techniques were best suited to different types of trees. In general, simple rendering techniques were best suited to trees with fewer complex ridges, like aspen, whereas detailed trees like oak did better with more complex approaches. Our final learning interface incorporates each best performing texture rendering technique and promotes playful engagement by presenting students with a game where they must guess which tree species matches the texture they feel with their haptic device. While there are some limitations to our approach, we believe our system is a promising first step towards an effective texture based experiential learning platform.

D4: Towards digital transformation: Designing a mobile phone app for caregivers of Children Living with Health Complexity 

Kattie Sepehri; Karon MacLean (Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: Children living with health complexity (CLHC) in BC require continuity of health care to improve their quality of life and decrease family burden. These children rely heavily on multiple care providers, and their challenges of accessing an already-fragmented health system are exacerbated by communication breakdowns between stakeholders. These challenges arise from the large volume of data collected from medical visits, the time constraints facing care providers and lack of integrated electronic databases. This leads to a burden on families who must continually repeat their child’s story, have limited access to health records, must manage and share masses of paper documents, and collaborate on accessing critical medical equipment. The Covid-19 pandemic has caused additional information challenges for these parents as it disrupted care, non-essential appointments and medical supply procurement. A digital data and communications solution to support this population and their families is long overdue. Our goal is to prototype and design an information dashboard using a user-centered design process in parallel with the technical work undertaken at BCCHRI (eg. Trustsphere and Cerner projects). Through 3 series of interviews with caregivers and qualitative analysis, we have created a list of design principles that could be used for future development of a digital care system. We have also created a medium-fiedlity prototype that provides a holistic solution for the care of CLHC. This prototype is intended to be a stepping stone for developing the content and features of an accessible user interface. This prototype can guide technical requirements such as database access, data management, and security protocols. Additionally, we have collected a set of highly important features that could be implemented in the system.

D5: Supporting Automatic Cognitive Restructuring in the Workplace to Change Unhelpful Patterns of Thinking

Kevin Chow (PhD Student, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Thomas Fritz (Associate Professor, Department of Informatics, University of Zürich); Joanna McGrenere (Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: Unhelpful patterns of thinking, or cognitive distortions, often occur frequently throughout the workday, whether we are aware of them or not. Because our thoughts, feelings, and behaviours are all interconnected, distorted thoughts can also lead to undesirable behaviours and emotions in the workplace, such as stress and procrastination. In this demo, we prototype the design of a system that aims to utilize natural language processing techniques to automatically detect distorted thoughts and help support knowledge workers in challenging and rewriting such thoughts to ultimately improve productivity and well-being outcomes in the workplace.

D6: VIVA: Virtual Healthcare Interactions Using Visual Analytics

Mara Solen (PhD-track MSc, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Jürgen Bernard (Assistant Professor, Informatics, University of Zurich); Helen Novak Lauscher (Assistant Director, Digital Emergency Medicine, UBC); Kurtis Stewart (Research Analyst, Digital Emergency Medicine, UBC); Kendall Ho (Professor, Digital Emergency Medicine, UBC); Tamara Munzner (Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Healthlink BC (HLBC) partnered with UBC’s Digital Emergency Medicine research group (DigEM) to rapidly add physicians to their 811 nurse hotline. To better improve their service, they required a way to analyze their data. We worked with them to develop a visual analytics system that could accommodate their needs. We investigated their existing uses of data analysis and visualization and discussed with them about how they would like to use their data. From this, we procured a list of user tasks to be possible in the system. We held weekly meetings with HLBC and DigEM to get rapid feedback on new developments and to better understand their needs. Feedback was generally positive, particularly when we showed how quickly the tool could be modified due to our use of configuration files. We reflected on this point and realized that, throughout development, we had employed a variety of methods to control how a program functions. We later solidified these into a set of controllability classes. Finally, we retrospectively pondered the development process of the tool through the lens of controllability and provided insights into the usefulness of such thought in future design studies.

D7: Authoring Virtual Peer Interactions for Lecture Videos

Mint Tanprasert (PhD, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Sidney Fels (Professor, ECE, UBC); Luanne Sinnamon (Associate Professor, iSchool, UBC); Dongwook Yoon (Assistant Professor, CS, UBC)

Abstract: Lecture videos have become a prevalent learning resource, due to the rising popularity of educational video platforms and the necessity for remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, lecture videos limit feasible pedagogical approaches, since there are no interactions that students would engage with and learn from in synchronous classes. In this study, we proposed virtual peers – virtual TAs and students that interact with each other as though they are watching the video for the first time together – to help real students learn from observing their interactions. We conducted two rounds of interviews and participatory designs with instructors and TAs to design an authoring tool that would help them create engaging virtual characters and author five types of pedagogically valuable interactions. The design received favorable preliminary feedback from instructors. They expect the tool to add valuable components that are missing from lecture videos with minimal additional effort on their parts.

D8: Design Guidelines to Mitigate Embodied Physical Harassment and Discomfort in Virtual Reality

Thomas Dykstra (MEng ECE, University of British Columbia); Ivan Song (Bsc., Cognitive Systems, UBC)

Abstract: The issue of harassment in social online settings is a pervasive problem, and VR technology can make it even worse. The body-tracking capabilities in modern VR devices create new forms of physical, embodied harassment. A user taking the first-person perspective of their avatar experiences enhanced reactions to perceived stimuli (e.g. the actions of other users), both positive and negative. Our research is focused on identifying these new forms of physical harassment, their causes, and ways to mitigate them. To this end, we used a multi-stage process of generating and refining design guidelines that when implemented, will help mitigate its negative effects or prevent it from happening. This process included surveying existing research and applications, collecting user testimonies, and performing a user study to evaluate our guidelines and refine as needed. We present the twelve resultant guidelines in this paper, as well as four proof-of-concept prototypes of VR mechanics that follow these guidelines.

D9: myWeekInSight: A Data Visualization-based Holistic Pain Management Web Application for Youth with Chronic Pain

Unma Desai (MSc, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Dr Katelynn E. Boerner (Department of Pediatrics, UBC); Haley Foladare (Computer Science, UBC); Dr Tamara Munzner (Computer Science, UBC); Dr Karon E. MacLean (Computer Science, UBC); Dr Tim F. Oberlander (Pediatrics, UBC); Javed Gill (Pain BC)

Abstract: Pediatric chronic pain is common, costly, and impacts daily academic and socioemotional well-being. Existing digital applications to help patients self-manage chronic pain often report low engagement, which may be due to inadequate stakeholder involvement in their design. These applications typically focus narrowly on either symptom tracking (emphasis on user providing data), or intervention delivery (translating an in-person intervention into a digital format). We hypothesize that if youth with chronic pain could actively explore data from their lived experiences, they could better relate their symptoms to other areas of their lives, and find ways to improve their general functioning. Specifically, our approach novelly uses interactive visualization of self-reported data as an intervention. We propose a visualization-based web application for interactively exploring personal health data, using data collected via ecological momentary assessments (EMA) to capture in-the-moment a youth’s everyday circumstances, symptoms and experiences. Users will fill the EMA survey 3 times a day via the web application. The latest and all previously entered data will be immediately visible on an interactive dashboard. Using both conventional (bar, line and bubble graphs) and custom visualizations, we can show temporal trends in aspects like symptom intensity, and also relationships between pain and contextual factors such as anxiety, sleep and peer relations. The visualizations and application features have been developed with guidance from pediatric chronic pain clinicians, a patient partner, and experts in information visualization and human-computer interaction. The visualizations are currently being evaluated in two phases, both with members of the target population: (1) design (N=10): assessment of comprehensibility, usability, and engagement through interviews, and (2) utility (N=50): in a 2-week deployment of a fully-functioning prototype.

D10: Shared Surfaces in AR

Xincheng Huang (PhD Student, Computer Science, University of British Columbia); Chenxinran (Elise) Shen (PhD Student, CS, UBC)

Abstract: Remote collaboration and communication are now common in people’s daily life and work. Prior research has looked into making remote collaborative experiences more natural. Prior studies have explored remote collaboration with physical content sharing. However, existing physical content sharing systems are projection-based, which require extra setup efforts and are inflexible to users’ physical contexts. In this project, we explored remote \textit{shared surfaces} with AR HMDs. We implemented and evaluated an asymmetrical collaborative system that supports physical content sharing and digital annotations. Our user experiments confirm the learnability and effectiveness of the system. We concluded design implications and enlightened future directions of such systems.

D11: Reflective Spring Cleaning: Using Personal Informatics to Support Infrequent Notification Personalization

Izabelle Janzen (PHD Candidate, UBC); Joanna McGrenere (Professor, CS, UBC);

Abstract: Distracting mobile notifications are a high-profile problem but previous research suggests notification management tools are underused because of the barriers users face in relation to the perceived benefits. We posit that users might be more motivated to personalize if they could view contextual data for how personalizations would have impacted their recent notifications. We propose the ‘Reflective Spring Cleaning’ approach to support notification management through infrequent personalization with visualization of collected notification data. To simplify and contextualize key trends in a user’s notifications, we framed these visualizations within a novel who-what-when data abstraction. We evaluated it through a four-week longitudinal study: 21 participants logged their notifications before and after a personalization session that included suggestions for notification management contextualized against visualizations of their recent notifications. A debriefing interview described their new experience after two more weeks of logging. Our approach encouraged users to critically reflect on their notifications, which frequently inspired them to personalize and improved the experience of the majority.

D12 Runaway Models: Scrollytelling for Language Model Bias Communication to Lay Audiences

Tamara Lottering (Design Informatics, University of Edinburgh); Benjamin Bach (Design Informatics, University of Edinburgh); Mennatallah El-Assady (ETH AI Centre)

Abstract: State-of-the-art language models power virtual assistants or enable computers to write stories, create art or program websites. Pre-trained on biased big data, these language models can unintentionally perpetuate harmful stereotypes based on race, gender or religion. This work evaluates design and explainability strategies used to build a scrollytelling interactive article entitled Runaway Models, that communicates how AI bias in language models perpetuates harmful stereotypes to non-technical lay audiences.